JimWendler.com
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  • February10th

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    A few weeks back it was very cold – the garage was numbing, the bars hurt my hands and the wind kept blowing snow into my face while I lifted. Just one of those days. And all I could think was “there are a million places I’d rather be than here.”

    It was fucking miserable. So many of my training days have been miserable. I can’t count how many practices I’ve been in where it was worse. I’ve played in -30 below weather a couple different times. I’ve run conditioning when it’s over 110 degrees.

    And they all sucked.

    And never did I ever think I was hardcore.

    Hardcore is a pretty new term in training – before you just tried to work harder than the next guy in hopes of performing better later. It had nothing to do with how big your training dick was. I don’t know a single person who has perspective that measures his training by how hardcore he is. Not one single person. A real competitor would never let his competition know about his training – I’m sure everyone and his mother has read Sun Tzu; appear weak when you are strongest, etc., Why would I want the other teams to know our guys were out running hills before they even got out of bed? Hell, they might take some notes!

    The point is hardcore is a term made up by people who aren’t hardcore. It’s used by pretenders. It’s used to motivate those that need some rah-rah bullshit to get them up before a lift. And therein lies the rub. Those who have trained, consistently, year in, year out, no matter the weather, day or circumstances don’t need motivation. They have discipline. And that’s why you train when it’s the last thing you want to do.

    Pegg and Wendler: prior to too many pregnancies

    Pegg and Wendler: prior to too many pregnancies

     

  • February2nd

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    lronhubbardcolor

     

    I’d like to elaborate on is something I’ve been asked a few times. “Does it bother you that someone who you believe isn’t as good as you (in terms of training/strength/fitness) is more successful/gets more attention/gets more likes/makes more money?” There are a lot of people that have hundreds of thousand of fans, yet they don’t have the experience and background – they just take great pics and offer general advice. To make it simple: Does it bother you when Johnny ComeLately gets more love than you?

     

    The answer is no. I never get mad at someone else’s success, no matter how one would define it. I don’t know anyone that measures success by social media “likes” but then again, I’m older and at this point in my life, all my friends are pretty like-minded. From a general point of view, being jealous or mad of someone else’s success is petty. Its junior high bullshit. If someone is successful in what they do, love what they do and harm no one – good times. That is just a “world view” of it. However, there is a “in the industry” view, I’d like to elaborate on.

     

    1. Maybe they deserve it.

      Everyone has an ego in this industry and that’s not always a bad thing. Every driven, successful person I know has a strong ego. This ego DRIVES them to be better, it shouldn’t hinder their success. But that doesn’t mean you can’t acknowledge you aren’t the best. So perhaps they are good, despite what you think.  And even if they don’t know that much, they are simply better at marketing themselves.

    2. You aren’t that good. 

      As said above, we all have egos and while I believe you should BELIEVE in what you do, we all have room to improve. And maybe, just maybe, the reason you aren’t successful is because you need to do some work. Just because you look the part and have snappy sayings/ideas/programs doesn’t mean you deserve success. Maybe you suck. Knowledge is power but it doesn’t mean you can apply that knowledge. And part of the application of knowledge, at least in this industry, is communication with your audience. I have seen many people who KNOW about training but couldn’t coach worth a damn. If you are trying to help people out with their training, whether it be in person, online, through articles, books or videos, you are coaching. Certainly not in a classical sense but in the spirit of the word. And if you can’t communicate with the audience, anything you say will fall flat. (On a side note, I see way too many people in this industry writing articles/books for others’ in the industry, not for people who are actually going to apply them. It’s akin to a dick-measuring contest; I don’t care what another professional thinks when I write an article. It’s not for them. I’ve never written anything to appease someone who does what I do. I write for the audience: people who have other jobs or careers who want to be stronger/better. They don’t have the background that I have and I wouldn’t expect them too. I’ve been criticized many times for my “too basic” ideas, my writing and approach by others in this industry. Many times. I almost always write to a younger me, the kid who was hungry to learn and ready to implement something that works. I don’t expect the same knowledge and love from others. I do expect discipline and consistency.) To sum it all up: you may not be that good, and even if you are, maybe you don’t know how to talk to those that listen.

     

    1. Your area of expertise isn’t worth as much.

      This is something I learned at EliteFTS and also when playing football. At EliteFTS, I don’t know if we sold more than 10 monolifts per YEAR while I was there. Things may have changed as EFS has grown but just because you are great at your thing doesn’t ensure you have success. You don’t play grind or death metal because you want to make money. And you don’t make monolifts exclusively if you want to be rich or famous, no matter how good the monolift is built.   In football, the hard lesson is that the more you contribute to the team, the more you are worth. The superstar quarterback gets more love than the special teams walk-on.. Strength training is never going to have the money and the love and the public draw as diets or fat loss. Great musicians will never make as much money as corporate-made pop stars that can’t write a song or play an instrument. Welcome to the world. It’s not fair.

    1. Success for them, is success for us.

      You can hate the programs and the selfies and all the bullshit that drives their popularity, but any success in this industry helps EVERYONE. While I don’t believe in the motto, “Something is better than nothing” when it comes to training, any exposure of some kind of training can only drive people deeper into this world. At worst, they do a few workouts and quit. At best, they keep learning and eventually they may follow what you say.

    1. This is not a new phenomenon.

      The internet has given people a new avenue for marketing themselves. But intense marketing hasn’t changed in the fitness industry over the past 50 years. Before the internet there were magazines; and much of the crap that you read in those rags wasn’t that good. You had people disguised as experts dispensing training advice that was horrid. And yes, the internet is a much bigger platform. But the fact that some people who didn’t deserve the respect and admiration get it- it happens in all professions. You can either bitch or do better. And I can tell you with certainly, no one gets anywhere with a big mouth and no legs.

    Do I think I’m better than some others that are more popular? Sure. But I have a biased view. I do know that time will eliminate the pretenders. People will eventually realize that they are full of shit. Not all the time, but most of the time. 99% of people reading this are entrenched in the “Training Underground”; they aren’t falling for trend diets and infomercial/TV fitness products. These things will always be there and will always sell. But those that are selling themselves as experts in the underground almost always get exposed if they are frauds. Getting upset/jealous/mad when someone has success, despite what you think, makes you the one thing we all are training to avoid; weak.